manners and conduct

The Importance of Tolerating the Anger of the Scholar

It is reported from Imām Al-Shāfiʿī:

There were two men who used to visit Al-Aʿmash, one who was concerned with ḥadīth and one who was not. One day Al-Aʿmash became angry with the man who studied ḥadīth, so the other said to him, “If he ever got angry with me like he got angry with you I would never go back to him.” To this Al-Aʿmash said, “In that case he would be a fool like you, leaving what benefits him because of my bad character (behaviour).”

Al-Khaṭīb, Al-Jāmiʿ li Akhlāq Al-Rāwī 1:338.

It is also reported from Imām Al-Shāfiʿī:

It was said to Sufyān b. ʿUyaynah, “People come to you from around the world, and [sometimes] you get angry with them? They might depart and leave you.” He replied, “In that case they would be fools like you, leaving what benefits them because of my bad character (behaviour).”

Op. cit. p339.

It is reported that Muʿāfā b. ʿImrān said:

The one who gets angry against a scholar is like someone who gets angry with the pillars of a mosque.

Ibid.

One Bad Quality Can Spoil Numerous Good Ones

It is reported that ʿUmar b. Al-Khaṭṭāb – Allāh be pleased with him – said to a young man while exhorting him:

A man might have ten qualities, nine of them good and one bad, but the nine good ones can be spoiled by the one bad quality. Beware of the slips and faults of youth.

ʿAbd Al-Razzāq Al-Ṣanʿānī, Al-Muṣannaf 8240.

Arguing with a Scholar or an Ignoramus

Yūnus reports: Maymūn b. Mihrān once wrote to me saying:

Beware of dispute and argumentation about the religion, and do not argue with a scholar nor an ignoramus. As for the scholar, he will withhold his knowledge from you, and will not be concerned with what you do. As for the ignorant person, he will only cause roughness in your heart and he will not obey you [anyway].

Al-Dārimī, Al-Sunan no. 302.

Two Qualities of the Noble

It is reported that Ayyūb Al-Sakhtiyānī – Allāh have mercy on him – said:

A man does not become noble until he has two qualities: he is undesirous of what other people possess, and he pardons and overlooks them.

Ibn Ḥibbān, Rawḍatu Al-ʿUqalāʾ p167.

The Danger of Over-Suspicion

ʿAbdullāh b. Masʿūd – Allāh be pleased with him – said:

The victim of theft might continue to suspect and conjecture [about who stole from him] until he becomes worse [in sin] than the thief.

Al-Bukhārī, Al-Adab Al-Mufrad no. 1289. Its chain of transmission was graded ṣaḥīḥ by Al-Albānī in Ṣaḥīḥ Al-Adab Al-Mufrad no.974.