attire

Consuming without Extravagance or Haughtiness

It is reported that ʿAbdullāh b. ʿAbbās – Allāh be pleased with them – said:

Wear what you wish and eat what you wish, as long as you avoid two practices: extravagance and haughtiness.

Ibn Abī Shaybah, Al-Muṣannaf ḥadīth 26601.

Wearing the Jilbab is an Obligation on the Free, Believing Women

Anas b. Mālik – Allāh be pleased with him – reports:

A female slave once entered upon ʿUmar b. Al-Khaṭṭāb – Allāh be pleased with him – and he recognised her as having been owned by some of the Muhājirūn or the Anṣār, but she was wearing a jilbāb covering her head with it, so he asked her, “Have you been freed?” To which she replied, “No.” So he said, “Then why the jilbāb? Remove it from your head, the jilbāb is only to be worn as a duty by the free women of the believers.” She hesitated and was slow to comply so he raised his stick and hit her on the head with it until she cast [the jilbāb] from her head.

Ibn Abī Shaybah, Al-Muṣannaf ḥadīth 6240. Graded ṣaḥīḥ according to the conditions of Muslim by Al-Albānī in Irwāʾ Al-Ġalīl 6:204.

The Rarity of Zuhd in Leadership

It is reported that Sufyān Al-Thawrī – Allāh have mercy on him – said:

I have not seen less zuhd (abstinence) in anything than leadership; you can see a man renouncing food, drink, wealth and clothing, but if his leadership is contested, he vehemently defends and has enmity over it.

Al-Dhahabī, Siyar ʾAʿlām Al-Nubalāʾ 7:262.

Filthy Silk

It is reported that a shaykh (older man) once came and greeted ‘Alī – Allāh be pleased with him, wearing a cloak decorated with silk at the front. He said to the man, What is this filth under your beard? The man looked around and said, I do not see anything. Another man said, He means the silk embroidery. The shaykh said, In that case, we will throw it away and never wear [such a thing] again.

Ibn Abī Shaybah, Al-Muṣannaf article 25187

From the Beauty of Knowledge

It is reported that Imām Aḥmad b. Ḥanbal – Allāh have mercy on him – said:

Al-Shāfi’ī saw me sitting in his circle, and there was some ink on my shirt I was trying to hide. He said, “Young man, why are you hiding it? Having ink on ones clothes is a sign of lofty conduct: to the sight it is black, but to the insight it is white (with the light of knowledge).”

It is reported that ‘Abdullāh b. Al-Mubārak – Allāh have mercy on him – said:

Ink on the clothes is the perfume of the scholars.

– Some put this in verse (from Arabic):

The ink-pot’s ink is the perfume of men
As saffron is the perfume of women
So the former befits the garments of those men
As the latter the garments of wives

It is reported that Imām Aḥmad said, seeing the students of ḥadīth approaching with their ink-pots:

These are the lanterns of Islām.

Al-Khaṭīb Al-Baghdādī, Al-Jāmi’ li-Akhlāq Al-Rāwī, articles 508, 509, 512 .