Abū Al-Dardāʾ

Noble Companion of the Prophet ﷺ and one of the great scholars and reciters of the Qurān amongst them. He is one of the Companions who read the Qurān and memorized it under the auspices of the Prophet ﷺ. He taught the Qurān in Damascus. He was known for his knowledge and piety. He died in 32H. Allāh be pleased with him.

Don’t be the Fifth

It is reported that Abū Al-Dardā` – Allāh be pleased with him – said:

Be a scholar or a learner, or a person who loves [the scholars] or a follower [of the scholars], but do not be the fifth.
Ḥumayd (one of the reporters) asked Al-Ḥasan (Al-Baṣri, who reported this from Abū Al-Dardā`), “And who is the fifth?” He replied, “A heretic (mubtadi’, religious innovator}.”

Ibn ʿAbd Al-Barr, Jāmi’ Bayān Al-‘Ilm 1:142.

Ask Allah a Lasting Faith

Mu’āwiyah b. Qurrah reports that Abū Al-Dardā` used to say, “We ask Allāh for a lasting faith (īmān), true certainty and beneficial knowledge.” Mu’āwiyah b. Qurrah then said, “So this indicates that there is a type of faith that does not last, and a type of certainty that is not true, and a type of knowledge that is not beneficial.”

Ibn Battah, Al-Ibānah Al-Kubrā Vol. 2 p498.

Note

The supplication mentioned above is as follows in Arabic:

Supplication reported from Abu Al-Darda about asking Allah for lasting faith, ture certainty and beneficial knowledge.

Food for Thought, not for Stomachs

It is reported that Abū Al-Dardā` – Allāh be pleased with him – used to say, “Learn knowledge before it is taken way, and it is taken away by its people (scholars) being taken away. The scholar and the student are partners in good and there is no good in any other people. The richest of men is the knowledgeable man whose knowledge is needed: he benefits those who need him and if done without, he benefits himself with the knowledge Allāh ‘azza wa jalla has placed with him. So how is it I see your scholars dying yet the ignorant amongst you not learning? I fear that the predecessor will depart and the successor will not learn. If the scholar studies, he only increases in knowledge, and he does not take anything away from knowledge. And if the ignorant studies, he will find knowledge firm and established. So how is it that I see you full up with food, yet starved of knowledge?”

Ibn ʿAbd Al-Barr, Jāmi’ Bayān Al-‘Ilm wa Fadlihi Vol. 2 p233.

Three Laughs and Three Tears

It is reported form Abū Al-Dardā – Allāh be pleased with him – that he said, “Three make me laugh, and three make me cry.

Those that make me laugh are a person who puts his hopes in this worldly life while death pursues him, a person who is heedless [of his Lord] while [his Lord] is not heedless of him, and a person who always laughs while he does not know whether he has pleased Allāh or angered Him.

What makes me cry is being separated from my beloved: Muhammad and his party (the Companions), the horrors of the time of death, and standing in front of Allāh ‘azza wa jall on the Day when the secrets will be revealed and I do not know will I then go to Paradise or Hell?”

Ibn Al-Mubārak, Al-Zuhd wa Al-Raqā`iq article 250.

Things have Changed

Umm Al-Dardâ` [the Younger] – Allâh be pleased with her – reports:

One day, Abû Al-Dardâ` came home angry, so I asked him, “What has made you so angry?” He replied, “By Allâh, I do not recognize anything from the Ummah of Muhammad except that they pray (salâh) in congregation.”

Al-Bukhârî, Al-Sahîh, Chapter on the Virtue of Praying Al-Fajr in Congregation.

We learn from this narration:

· Prayer (salâh) in congregation is from the characteristics of the Ummah of Allâh’s Messenger – Allâh’s peace and blessings be upon him.

· The noble Companion Abû Al-Dardâ` was conveying the idea that deficiency and negative changes had begun to creep in to the practices of the Muslims, and he wanted to point out this evil so that people could be aware and try to keep to the original teachings. Al-Hâfidh Ibn Hajr states, “Abû Al-Dardâ` intended to point out that all the deeds of those mentioned had suffered some degree of deficiency and change, except praying in congregation. This [change] is relative, for the condition of the people during the time of the Prophet was better compared to how it changed after that time; and during the time of the Two Shaykhs (Abû Bakr and ‘Umar) it was better compared to how it was after them. It is as if this concern came from Abû Al-Dardâ` towards the end of his life – during the latter part of ‘Uthmân’s Caliphate. And just imagine, if that virtuous generation was described by Abû Al-Dardâ` as it was, then what about those who came after them up to our own time?!”

· This narration shows us that we should be angry if some aspect of the religion is changed, and that renouncing evil can be done by showing one’s anger if one is not able to do any more than that.

Taken from Fath Al-Bârî of Ibn Rajab and Fath Al-Bârî of Ibn Hajr; both of which are commentaries on Sahîh Al-Bukhârî.