Anas b. Mālik

Do you have to make up fasts consecutively? [Fiqh of Fasting]

Ibn ‘Abbās and Abū Hurayrah – Allāh be pleased with them – said, “There is no harm in making up [fasts of] Ramaḍān separately from one another.”

ʿAbd Al-Razzāq, Al-Muṣannaf 4:243; Ibn Abī Shaybah, Al-Muṣannaf article 9114; Al-Dāraquṭnī, Al-Sunan 2:193.

Abū ‘Ubaydah b. Al-Jarrāḥ – Allāh be pleased with him – said, when asked about making up missed fasts of Ramaḍān separately, “Allāh did not legislate upon you the breaking of the fast, and then cause hardship on you when making it up, so count the days [you excusably missed] and fast them as you wish.”

Ibn Abī Shaybah, op. cit. article 9133.

Anas b. Mālik – Allāh be pleased with him – said, “If you wish, make up [missed fasts of] Ramaḍān consecutively, or if you wish, make them up separately.”

Ibid. article 9115.

How the Salaf were (and weren’t) when hearing the Quran and Dhikr

It was said to ‘Ā`ishah – Allāh be pleased with her, “There are people who faint when they hear the Quran.” She said. “The Quran is nobler than to have people lose their minds from it. Rather, it [should be] as Allāh the Mighty and Sublime said:

Those who fear their Lord tremble with fear by it, then their skins and hearts settle to the remembrance of Allah. (Sūrah Al-Zumar: 23)

Abū ‘Ubayd Al-Qāsim b. Sallām, Faḍā`il Al-Qur`ān p214.

It is reported that ʿAbdullāh b. ‘Urwah b. Al-Zubayr said, “I asked my grandmother Asmā` (bint Abī Bakr) – Allāh be pleased with her, ‘How were the Companions of Allāh’s Messenger – Allāh peace and praise be upon him – when they heard the Quran?’ She replied, ‘their eyes would shed tears and they would tremble (with fear), as Allāh described them (in the Quran).’ I said, ‘There are some people here who, when they hear the Quran, fall down unconscious,’ She said, ‘I seek refuge with Allāh from the accursed Shayṭān.’”

Al-Bayhaqī, Shu’ab Al-Īmān 3:417; Ibn Al-Mubārak, Al-Zuhd wa Al-Raqā`iq 3:54 with a slightly variant wording.

It is also reported that Asmā` was asked, “Did any of the Salaf used to faint out of the fear of Allāh?” She replied, “No, but they used to cry.”

Al-Qāsim b. Salām, op. cit. p214.

It is reported that Ibn ʿUmar – Allāh be pleased with him – once passed by a man from Iraq who had dropped unconscious. He asked, “What is wrong with him?” [People] replied, “When the Quran is recited to him or he hears the remembrance of Allāh he falls unconscious out of his fear of Allāh.” Ibn ʿUmar said, “We fear Allāh and we do not drop unconscious!”

Ibid p214; Al-Baghawī in his Tafsīr, Sūrah Al-Zumar: 23 with a slightly variant wording.

It is reported that Anas b. Mālik was asked about people who drop unconscious when the Quran is recited to them. He said, “That is the behavior of the Khawārij.”

Al-Qāsim b. Salām, op. cit. p215.

It is reported that Muḥammad b. Sīrīn said, having been asked about a man who drops unconscious when the Quran is recited to him, “Make an appointment between us and him, we will sit on a wall, and the Quran – from beginning to end – will be recited unto him. If he falls off the wall, he is as he claims.”

Ibid., Al-Baghawī, op. cit.

Breaking the fast as soon as the sun sets [Sunnah of Fasting]

Sa’īd b. Al-Musayyib reports from his father, “I was once sitting with ʿUmar when a group of people arrived from Al-Shām. ʿUmar enquired about them and how they were; he asked, ‘Do the people of Al-Shām hasten to break the fast.’ He said, ‘Yes.’ [ʿUmar] said, ‘They will not cease to remain upon good as long as they do this, and do not wait for the stars [to come out] as the people of Irāq do.’”

ʿAbd Al-Razzāq Al-Ṣanʿānī, Al-Muṣannaf 4:225.

‘Amr b. Maymūn Al-Awdī reports, “The Companions of Muḥammad – Allāh’s peace and blessings be upon him – used to be the quickest to break the fast and the slowest in taking the pre-dawn meal.”

Ibid. p226.

Ibn Al-Musayyib also reports that ʿUmar wrote to the commanders of the various regions, ‘Do not be of the procrastinators when breaking the fast, and nor of those who wait for the stars before they start praying [al-maghrib].’

Ibid. p225.

Mūsā b. Anas reports that Anas [ibn Mālik] used to have his slave-girl go to the top of his house, instructing her, ‘When the horizon becomes even (evenly lit, marking sunset), tell me.’

Ibn Abī Shaybah, Al-Muṣannaf 2:430.

Abū Al-Tiyāḥ Al-Ḍabaʾī reports that “he used to break fast with Ibn ʿAbbās during Ramaḍān. When evening approached he would send a girl from his household to the roof [to look out], and when the sun set he would make the call to prayer (adhān). He would eat with us, and when he had finished, the call for the commencement of prayer (iqāmah) would be given, and he would pray, and we would pray with him.”

Ibid. p429.

Eating to Fast [not Fasting to Eat]

It is reported that once, some good food was served to Anas [Ibn Mālik] – Allāh be pleased with him, and [the person who served the food] was well off enough to afford good food. As he was eating, he kept a morsel of the food in his mouth for a while, then looked at the people and began to cry. Then he said, “By Allāh, I have accompanied people who, if they could get hold of this kind of food, would have fasted even more often, and spent less time not fasting. One of them would find only milk mixed with water [as food], which he would drink and then fast on.”

Al-Mu’āfā b. ‘Imrān, Kitāb Al-Zuhd article 215.

Relative Values

Anas b. Mālik – Allah be pleased with him – said:

You people do things today that you regard as less significant than a strand of hair, whereas we, during the time of the Prophet – peace and blessings be upon him – used to consider them destructive sins.

Al-Bukhārī in his Ṣaḥīḥ, Chapter on sins that are seen as insignificant but which should be kept away from.